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New article on Emergency Powers: The Determinants of Emergency Constitutions

by Dr. Alkmini Fotiadou, Centre For European Constitutional Law.
In recent years we are increasingly challenged to revisit the notion of emergency powers. The response to the Paris attacks is only the latest episode, while the concept of (undeclared) emergency was frequently used in the financial crisis jurisprudence.
In a very interesting paper, Christian Bjørnskov (Aarhus University Denmark) and Stefan Voigt (University of Hamburg, Germany) point out that little is known about the amount of additional powers granted to governments acting under a state of emergency, the trends in the evolution of emergency provisions over time, and the factors that cause societies to adopt them in the first place.

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Ukraine, the ICCPR and State of Emergency Declarations

by Annemarie Stomp, Research intern with the State of Emergency Project and Prof. Dr. Andrej Zwitter, University of Groningen.

Ukraine remains unstable and might be facing a civil war. On the 16th of March, based on a referendum Crimea separated itself (at least de facto) from the Ukraine and the Russian State Duma ratified an agreement that makes Crimea part of the Russian Federation. Subsequently, armed groups began seizing government buildings also in the eastern part of Ukraine. By the 16th of April, protesters controlled administrative buildings in eight cities of the Donetsk Oblast.

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Mosques of Sultan Hasan and al-Rifa'i Seen from the Citadel

Egypt’s State of Emergency Revisited

by Prof. Dr. Andrej Zwitter, University of Groningen

After 44 years of reign by emergency powers, the Egyptian people forced President Mubarak to resign on 11 February 2011. While Egypt has ratified the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in 1982, since then it has not declared any of its human rights derogations under Article 4 ICCPR as the State of Emergency Mapping Database illustrates.

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